For Facility Managers

Hiring New Instructors

Making a hiring decision is never easy. How do you know that the instructor is going to fit in with your team? Do they know their stuff? Are they prepared to teach a class? All are great questions that you need to find the answer to before you offer the potential instructor a job. I recently had a discussion with one group fitness director that has a set plan to help develop and evaluate her potential instructors. It doesn?t matter what is on the instructor?s resume, they all go through the same initiation process. An instructor is either offered a class or they part ways at the end of this process. The director requires each potential instructor to observe (either ride or hugging a wall) in six different classes with at least two different instructors chosen by the director. They get the feel for the studio and an overall idea of what is expected from each instructor in terms of class design, administration and teamwork. After they have completed their six observations, they get to teach a small portion of several classes. They work with their mentor instructor to develop their own music, cues and profile for that small segment. Their segment is just an extension of the lead instructor?s profile. This ensures that the training purpose of the class is not deviated from during the potential instructor?s portion of the class. The time is expanded each class until the potential instructor teaches about half of the class. During the next step, the director observes a full class that the candidate gets to prepare and present. The director uses this as an opportunity to determine if the potential instructor stays true to the Spinning® program and also is capable of handling their own class. Finally, the director will pull together all of the instructors that have participated in this process. Together they make a team decision whether or not hire the auditioning instructor. The decision is based upon the instructors ability as well as how well they fit within the team. This process helps not only the club to ensure that their Spinning® program remains strong, but also provides a mentorship for the potential instructor. A resume is good, but practical experience and development is even better to judge the abilities, skills and coaching style of the potential new instructor. Blog by Ralph Mlady for community.spinning.com 4/17/2011
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