For All Spinning® Enthusiasts

The Honour of Mentoring - for the Mentoree (part I)

Over the years I have been very fortunate to have been asked by instructors to mentor them during the start of their careers as instructors as well as some experienced instructors who feel they have reached a plateau.  When someone comes to me and asks for help, I'm always flattered and feel it's a privilege to be entrusted with such a mission.

An important thing to remember in mentoring,  is not to try to create a "mini-me", and let the instructor discover who they are and what style of teaching they will develop over time. I am not a lover of top 40 hits or lots of vocals in my classes, but I have seen that there are many instructors who do use more popular music and do a great job at it - pleasing the members and keep their classes full, which management want to see, while still maintaining the integrity of the Spinning® programme.

Stand back, be objective and give guidance, support and
understanding. Give basic guidelines such as using instrumental music for warm-ups, having pre-class and post-class music at the ready, getting early to class and allowing time afterwards to chat with members is all good, sound advice. 

Suggest music genres to listen out for, and how they can be used for hills or flats, and connect them to the Spinning® music scene with CDs and through iTunes at http://www.spinning.com/en/webshop/products/109/music_downloads

Offer to help plan a couple of profiles with them, giving
them confidence on how to build a road and matching the right kind of music, including RPM versus BPM as an option to help with rhythm. Help them design specific Energy Zones™ to get over any fears they have of how to create a specific road.

Give your opinion without judging and be supportive without harsh criticism.  The last thing anyone wants is to feel belittled.

Finally, the mentoree should, over time, receive some or all of these benefits: develop more knowledge of the Spinning® programme, gain knowledge on specific objectives, feel they are gaining more information and training on an informal basis, know they are in a safe environment, get encouragement, support and time from their mentor, receive help on ideas and developing them, be just challenged enough to improve their skills and hone their special talent.

What about the mentor? Well there are many benefits there too - coming up next week.

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